Institut für Funktionelle Grenzflächen (IFG)

Site-Selective Growth of Surface-Anchored Metal-Organic Frameworks on Self-Assembled Monolayer Patterns Prepared by AFM Nanografting

  • Autor:

    Ladnorg, T. / Welle, A. / Heißler, S. / Wöll, C. / Gliemann, H. (2013)

  • Quelle:

    Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 4 (2013), 638-648

  • Datum: 2013
  • Ladnorg, T. / Welle, A. / Heißler, S. / Wöll, C. / Gliemann, H. (2013): „Site-Selective Growth of Surface-Anchored Metal-Organic Frameworks on Self-Assembled Monolayer Patterns Prepared by AFM Nanografting“. In: Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 4 (2013), 638-648

Abstract

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Surface anchored metal-organic frameworks, SURMOFs, are highly porous materials, which can be grown on modified substrates as highly oriented, crystalline coatings by a quasi-epitaxial layer-by-layer method (liquid-phase epitaxy, or LPE). The chemical termination of the supporting substrate is crucial, because the most convenient method for substrate modification is the formation of a suitable self-assembled monolayer.

The choice of a particular SAM also allows for control over the orientation of the SURMOF. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the site-selective growth of the SURMOF HKUST-1 on thiol-based self-assembled monolayers patterned by the nanografting technique, with an atomic force microscope as a structuring tool. Two different approaches were applied: The first one is based on 3-mercaptopropionic acid molecules which are grafted in a 1-decanethiolate SAM, which serves as a matrix for this nanolithography. The second approach uses 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid, which is grafted in a matrix of an 1-octadecanethiolate SAM.

In both cases a site-selective growth of the SURMOF is observed. In the latter case the roughness of the HKUST-1 is found to be significantly higher than for the 1-mercaptopropionic acid. The successful grafting process was verified by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. The SURMOF structures grown via LPE were investigated and characterized by atomic force microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared microscopy.